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Can you take coq10 if breast feeding ?

Chemical structure of coenzyme Q10.
I am a breastfeeding mother and i want to know if it is safe to use COQ10?
Is COQ10 safe for nursing mother and child?
Does COQ10 extracts into breast milk?
Does COQ10 has any long term or short term side effects on infants?
Can COQ10 influence milk supply or can COQ10 decrease milk supply in lactating mothers?
Chemical structure of coenzyme Q10.
Chemical structure of coenzyme Q10.

Answer by Dr. Ru:

  • DrLact safety Score for COQ10 is 3 out of 8 which is considered Low Risk as per our analyses.
  • A safety Score of 3 indicates that usage of COQ10 may cause some minor side effects in breastfed baby.
  • Our study of different scientific research indicates that COQ10 may cause moderate to no side effects in lactating mother.
  • Most of scientific studies and research papers declaring usage of COQ10 low risk in breastfeeding are based on normal dosage and may not hold true for higher dosage.
  • While using COQ10 We suggest monitoring child for possible reactions. It is also important to understand that side effects vary largely based on age of breastfed child and time of medication in addition to dosage.
  • Score calculated using the DrLact safety Version 1.2 model, this score ranges from 0 to 8 and measures overall safety of drug in lactation. Scores are primarily calculated using publicly available case studies, research papers, other scientific journals and publically available data.

Answer by DrLact: About COQ10 usage in lactation

Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) is a normal part of the diet, and is also endogenously synthesized. It is a normal component of human milk, but milk levels are slightly low in the breastmilk of mothers with preterm infants. Coenzyme Q10 has no specific lactation-related uses and no data exist on the safety and efficacy of supplementation in nursing mothers or infants. Coenzyme Q10 supplements are usually well tolerated with only infrequent, minor side effects. Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information #about dietary supplements# is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

from:  https://drlact.com/drug/45444/coq10-in-breastfeeding

what is coq10?

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, with the highest levels in the heart, liver, kidneys, and pancreas. It is sold in the United States as a dietary supplement. Because CoQ10 has important functions in the body and because people with some diseases have reduced levels of this substance, researchers have been interested in finding out whether CoQ10 supplements might have health benefits.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that your body produces naturally. Your cells use CoQ10 for growth and maintenance. Levels of CoQ10 in your body decrease as you age. CoQ10 levels have also been found to be lower in people with certain conditions, such as heart disease. CoQ10 is found in meat, fish and whole grains. The amount of CoQ10 found in these dietary sources, however, isn’t enough to significantly increase CoQ10 levels in your body.

As a supplement, CoQ10 supplement is available as capsules, tablets and by IV. CoQ10 might help treat certain heart conditions, as well as migraines and Parkinson’s disease.

Bottom Line

  • CoQ10 has not been shown to be of value in treating cancer, but it may reduce the risk of heart damage caused by one type of cancer chemotherapy drug.
  • Only a few studies have looked at whether CoQ10 might help prevent heart disease, and their results are inconclusive. Research on the effects of CoQ10 in heart failure is also inconclusive. However, there is evidence that CoQ10 may reduce the risk of some complications of heart surgery.
  • Although results of individual studies have varied, the overall scientific evidence does not support the idea that CoQ10 can reduce muscle pain caused by the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins.
  • The small amount of evidence currently available suggests that CoQ10 probably doesn’t have a meaningful effect on blood pressure.
  • Guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society say that CoQ10 is “possibly effective” in preventing migraines, but this conclusion is based on limited evidence.
  • A major National Institutes of Health-funded study showed that CoQ10, even in higher-than-usual doses, didn’t improve symptoms in patients with early Parkinson’s disease. A 2017 evaluation of this study and several other, smaller studies concluded that CoQ10 is not helpful for Parkinson’s symptoms.
  • CoQ10 has also been studied for a variety of other conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), Down syndrome, Huntington’s disease, and male infertility, but the research is too limited for any conclusions to be drawn.

Safety

  • No serious side effects of CoQ10 have been reported. Mild side effects such as insomnia or digestive upsets may occur.
  • CoQ10 may interact with the anticoagulant (blood thinner) warfarin and the diabetes drug insulin, and it may not be compatible with some types of cancer treatment.

Evidence

Research on CoQ10 use for specific conditions and activities shows:

  • Heart conditions. CoQ10 has been shown to improve symptoms of congestive heart failure. Although findings are mixed, CoQ10 might help reduce blood pressure. Some research also suggests that when combined with other nutrients, CoQ10 might aid recovery in people who’ve had bypass and heart valve surgeries.
  • Parkinson’s disease. Early research suggests that high doses of CoQ10 might be beneficial for people in the early stages of this progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement.
  • Statin-induced myopathy. Some research suggests that CoQ10 might help ease muscle weakness sometimes associated with taking statins.
  • Migraines. Some research suggests that CoQ10 might decrease the frequency of these headaches.
  • Physical performance. Because CoQ10 is involved in energy production, it’s believed that this supplement might improve your physical performance. Research in this area has produced mixed results, however.

Generally safe

CoQ10 supplements might be beneficial for treating conditions such as congestive heart failure and Parkinson’s disease. CoQ10 is considered safe, with few side effects. However, be sure to take this supplement under your doctor’s supervision.

Safety and side effects

CoQ10 supplements appear to be safe and to produce few side effects when taken as directed.

Mild side effects might include:

  • Upper abdominal pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Rashes
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Light sensitivity
  • Irritability

The safety of use of CoQ10 during pregnancy and breast-feeding hasn’t been established. Don’t use CoQ10 if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.

Interactions

Possible interactions include:

  • Anticoagulants. CoQ10 might make blood-thinning drugs, such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), less effective. This could increase the risk of a blood clot.

What is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) ? Can coenzyme Q10 help with migraines?

 

Does USANA has coenzyme Q10 ?

YES.

CoQuinone 100 Supplement Facts
CoQuinone 100 Supplement Facts

 

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